The Version Interview... Lewis Reeves on E4's Crazyhead

Crazyhead’ (formerly announced as Crazy Face), is a bold new comedy horror series from BAFTA award-winning creator of ‘Misfits’ Howard Overman, will air on E4 and Netflix.

Filled with Overman’s dark humour and unexpected twists, Crazyhead is a funny, gripping series about friendship, love and facing your demons that follows the angst and exorcisms of an unlikely duo of demon hunters, played by Cara Theobold (‘Downton Abbey’) and Susan Wokoma (E4’s ‘Chewing Gum’).

The six-part series which begins filming this week in Bristol, is being produced by Urban Myth Films for Channel 4 in association with Netflix. Crazyhead will be broadcast in the UK exclusively on E4, with Netflix streaming the series globally following E4’s UK premiere.

Lewis Reeves tells us more...

How would you describe Crazyhead, what’s it about?

In the world of Crazyhead we have a secret society of demons who feed on the souls of humans, and hide in human bodies. Our leading lady Amy can see them but she’s not taken seriously. Our other leading lady Raquel is a demon-hunter. So you have these two girls who are forced into each other’s worlds to become demon hunters together and use their powers to kick ass.

How does Jake fit into their world?

Jake is Amy’s best friend and works with her, but is secretly in love with her. He’s gullible enough to go along and drive them around on these crazy missions and doesn’t realise what he’s getting involved in until it’s too late.

How would you describe Jake?

He’s the most fun character I’ve ever had to play. He says what he wants, does what he wants the whole time without worrying about repercussions. Best way of describing him is that he’s got a really good heart and a really good brain but they’re both in his pants. They’re in the wrong place. He doesn’t think about things too much so that’s kind of his charm as well – he’s forever putting his foot in his mouth. Everything’s a joke with him – he’s so much fun.

Jake has a massive crush on Amy, is it reciprocated?

I think he hopes it is. He kind of jokey with her, he jokes about everything, so from Amy’s perspective she never takes him seriously. He chucks the offers out there but it’s never full-hearted. Maybe if he jumped both feet in she’d take him more seriously. But he doesn’t. He has this big hope but maybe deep down he feels that Amy’s too good for him. To him Amy’s the perfect girl, but maybe she’s unattainable. But he keeps the faith and keeps plugging away.

He gets roped into Amy and Raquel’s world, does he get to battle demons too?

That was the best thing about it. You get to play all the comedy of it but then you’re actually beating people up – well, with Jake, trying to beat people up and getting beaten up himself. It was really fun to play a rounded character like that. Car chases, punching people, explosions and stuff – you have to pinch yourself as to what a wicked gig this is. But Jake doesn’t really know what’s going on at first, so the girls are five, ten steps ahead of him in full kick-ass karate demon-kicking mode, and Jake’s doing some baby punches behind them. It’s just as fun to play, getting beaten up as beating people up. In fact I’m better at getting beaten up.

What do you think it is about Howard’s work that makes it stand out?

He’s certainly different to generally what’s on TV. He combines drama with comedy really well. You get fully -fledged three-dimensional characters doing ridiculous things but he also makes you feel for them, you empathise with them, even if morally maybe what they’re doing isn’t the right thing. You root for the characters the whole way. In this you’ve got the whole demon world and it’s totally out there and alien, but they’re done in such human way. They’re such rounded characters, you’ve got a demon who’s a single mum and dropping off her kids. He brings that supernatural world so much closer. Even though we’re doing these outlandish things you buy into it because you buy into the characters. I think that’s what separates him from other writers.

Do you believe in the supernatural paranormal world?

No, but it’s that classic thing, isn’t it, when you turn the lights out and you think ‘oh shit, there could be a ghost in here’. Or walking down a dark corridor and you walk a bit quicker. Or close your eyes under the bath water and think there’s a shark – those totally illogical fears. But no, I don’t really believe in it.

Do you think audiences will feel scared, are there scary moments?

Yeah, it’s really jumpy, it holds the suspense well, and because the demons are secret and embody people you don’t know when they’re going to pop out. I think the scares are going to be good.